Custom Built Systems click images to enlarge


Rockland Research Corporation specializes in the design and manufacture of equipment tailored to custom applications.

Walker Module for SpectroscopyOur long history of high pressure system design and the knowledge of research techniques and methodology allows for a product that will meet all of your experimentation needs. The TAP98 system we built is just one example of this Rockland Research ingenuity.  We have built many presses and multi-anvils to fit non-standard experimentation envelopes.


The Walker module for spectroscopy: we have actually designed and manufactured several different devices for beamline research.  In the slide show you can see a Walker module with a bare aluminum shield (not blue) that had a 10 mm hole centered on the outside diameter of the stress ring. This was a special device built for Dr David Walker to perform Epithermal Neutron Resonance Spectroscopy at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in England.


The intention of this research was to allow calibration of thermocouples at very high pressures, which has never been done before. The same device also has beam ports 35 degrees off of the vertical axis intended for X-ray diffraction work with the press and module placed in the beamline horizontally. The device is currently being used at the Daresbury Laboratory in England.1000 Metric Ton Custom Built Press

We have also built a split-ring Walker module called T25 for the Argonne National Laboratory which allows the X-ray beam to enter on the horizontal axis. This device has been used successfully for many experiments at the Advanced Photon Source (APS)  over the last several years.

We are currently working on several other devices for beamline research. One is a large deformation DIA device named ZIA which we are building for Los Alamos National Laboratory for use in the TAPLUS 2000 press at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center.  Another project currently under construction is a split-ring cubic multi anvil module which allows beam access on the horizontal axis, and we have also begun working on a split-ring hybrid (6/8) module for the Advanced Photon Source which is intended for very high pressure research (greater than 40 GPa).

Finally we have built several D.DIA (Deformation DIA) devices for the Lawrence Livermore Lab, Brookhaven Lab, Argonne Lab and the University of California.  These are small cubic devices with beamline access on the horizontal plane with the additional ability to independently operate hydraulic cylinders on the Z axis for deformation research.